Website Marketing Launch

In addition to traditional on-site and off-site SEO tactics, local SEO requires a few additional points of attention. Thanks to Google’s Pigeon algorithm update, the algorithm now uses third party directories as a major source of information for local businesses.

Developing a strong reputation by joining LinkedIn groups related to your industry and answering questions in their forums may pay off for your business. LinkedIn charges a small subscription fee for optional Pro accounts which give you additional intelligence about other users.

It goes without saying that providing outstanding customer service is the #1 way to get great online reviews. However , a little extra legwork to encourage positive reviews can go a long way to protecting your brand’s reputationline.

A bridge between the offline and online worlds, QR codes allow smartphone owners to scan them and be directed to a webpage that contains more information about the product or service being advertised. A number of websites offer free QR code generators, but there’s cost involved to purchase the ads themselves. It’s sort of a hybrid between Facebook and Twitter, allowing for group conversations with some of your more tech-savvy customers and prospects. Ads on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter are easy to set up on your own. You can select a target audience for your ads based on potential customers’ demographic information, geographic location, and interests—all at reasonable prices. Some guidance is still recommended to ensure the best use of your ad dollars. Facebook Pages offer an easy way to get a conversation going with your customers, improve loyalty, ask for feedback, and build community.

Successful Business Pages on Facebook require frequent monitoring and content updates. Blogging is a great way to demonstrate your expertise and build relationships with prospective customers, peers, and your existing customers. It can give a big boost to your SEO but requires a significant time commitment. Similarly, the Pigeon update of 2014 didn’t shake things up much. It introduced a handful of new ranking factors—such as reviews on Yelp and other third party directory sites—but the core ranking factors remained unaffected.

If you’re having trouble generating topic ideas, look to each location’s recent events. Obviously, your content marketing campaign can’t solely focus on your office, but posting these kinds of topics occasionally can seriously help your local ranks when you have multiple locations.

As evidence of this approach, we can turn to the type of updates that have rolled out since 2012. There was the Hummingbird update of 2013, which introduced “semantic search” functionality to Google. Through semantic search, Google became better able to interpret the intent behind an user’s query, rather than the keywords of the query itself. Nevertheless, the fundamental ranking factors—quality of content, etc . —didn’t change, so the update didn’t affect many queries. Released in 2013, this update made keyword-based strategies completely obsolete. It introduced “semantic search” to the algorithm, which analyzes the intent behind an user’s query rather than dissecting its keyword contents. While Panda focused more on-site factors and content, the Penguin algorithm was designed to look for unnatural manipulation of search engine rankings occurring offsite.

Marketing Online

The best way to do this is to create a separate page for each of your locations, usually listed in the navigation under “Locations” or something similar. Create a page title that includes each city or neighborhood, and write a full body of content that elaborates on the unique features of each location. Be sure to also include the address and phone number of each location these individual pages. This will clearly demonstrate to Google how your locations are set up, and how they all relate to your master brand.